June 15, 2017 · by Foundation Staff · Letter from the Chair

June 2017

When my grandfather, Roy A. Hunt, established the foundation, it was with a basic mission: to support organizations that work to improve quality of life. Fifty years later, interpreting this remains the responsibility of my fellow trustees and the Roy A. Hunt Foundation staff. As a foundation, we understand the value and connectedness of us all – as a family, as members of the community, and as instruments of change. Martin Luther King stated at his commencement address at Oberlin College, “All people are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly.” We believe this sentiment holds true now more than ever and, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation remains committed to this.

In fiscal year 16/17, The Roy A. Hunt Foundation’s grantmaking was strengthened by the work we did across our three focus areas: Environment, Community Development, and Youth Violence Prevention. These focus areas continue to provide us an opportunity to make an impact in targeted, defined partner communities. To date, these initiatives have contributed $11.2million. We are also extremely proud that our International Development Committee made its first grant in this year. This cross-generational committee considers organizations that improve the health and self-development of women and girls in poverty in developing countries. Trustee-sponsored General Grants continue to provide vital support to organizations across the country in areas such as programming, capital, general operating, and scholarships.

Our Trustees studiously manage the resources that have flourished out of our founder’s initial gift to the foundation and we remain committed to searching out prudent, responsible investment options. Our endowment is currently $78.7million, with an increased portion committed to socially responsible investments.

Without our incredible partners, grantees, and colleagues, the work we do wouldn’t be possible. Thank you for ongoing support and interest in the Roy A. Hunt Foundation.

As always, feel free to contact our office at info@rahuntfdn.org or 412.281.8734 if you have questions.

Sincerely,

Helen Hunt Bouscaren
FY17 Executive Committee Chair

January 19, 2017 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News

We’ve finished awarding and paying grants for our current fiscal year, with $3,368,150 being delivered to nonprofits and schools across the country. You can download a new PDF of this year’s and last year’s grants. And, you can view and interactive map of our FY17 grants below. In the Map Options tab on the upper left, you can filter out different groups of grants and search based on proximity to an address.

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July 12, 2016 · by Foundation Staff · Letter from the Chair

Letter from the Executive Committee Chair

July 2016

As my second term as Chair of the Executive Committee has come to a close, and I prepare to turn over the gavel to my very capable successor, Helen Hunt Bouscaren, I would like to reflect on our activities over the past fiscal year (June 2015 to May 2016). It has been an important year because of the fine work of our grantees, and also because the Roy A. Hunt Foundation has reached the 50-year milestone – fifty years of carrying out our founders’ intent. Fifty years of making a difference for people in communities across this country and around the world. Fifty years of grantmaking, awarding $99,912,417 to over 1,500 organizations. And, fifty years of working together as an extended family. We excitedly look forward to the next fifty.

My fellow Trustees and I are honored by the work of our non-profit partners and we pledge to continue to explore partnerships that will make differences in the lives of individuals, build stronger communities, and create a healthier planet. The Trustees of the Roy A. Hunt Foundation approved 382 grants to an array of organizations totaling $3,268,980 during 2015. We are extremely proud that these grants represent the collective decision-making of three generations located in nationally diverse, geographic locations. The majority of our awards remain for general grants invited by the Trustees and/or of historical importance to the family. The grant guidelines for all initiatives and general grants can be found on our website.

Since inception, the Foundation has invested over $4,400,000 in Special Initiative grants to advance community development, youth violence prevention, and environment efforts. These projects range from:

  • national, systems-level environment grants to support sustainable solutions combating environmental damage;
  • community development grants to low-income communities that improve the prosperity of both people and place;
  • youth violence prevention and intervention grants aimed at reducing violence and the risk factors that contribute to it;
  • to Next Generation grants focusing on low-income family financial opportunity programs.

In addition to our Special Initiatives grants, the Obesity and Nutrition and International Development Learning Circles continue to research potential giving opportunities and are poised to consider grants in the near future.

The total assets of the Foundation reached approximately $72.9 million by fiscal year-end. The Investment Committee is committed to continually and prudently growing and protecting the assets and has undertaken a six-month long special review of investments, managers, and policies.

We will continue working to honor our founders, Roy and Rachel Hunt, and the principles of giving and family so important to them. I look forward to working alongside the incoming Chair, as we grow as a family and evolve as grantmakers.

We welcome your comments and questions. Call Jenny Kelly, Executive Director, at 412.281.8734 or email our office at info@rahuntfdn.org.

Thank you,
John B. Hunt
FY16 Executive Committee Chair

· by Foundation Staff · Letter from the Chair

July 2015

I’m pleased to have the opportunity to share with you the activities of the Roy A. Hunt Foundation during the 2015 fiscal year (June 2014 to May 2015). The Foundation is approaching its 50th year and as our family of Trustees grows, we continue to pass along the principles of giving and sharing so important to our founders, Roy and Rachel Hunt. Gathering and learning as a family is an important part of our Foundation, and we strive to work together– in all of our diverse geography, ages, and points of view.

Growth and Change

This has been a year of organizational change and gratifying grantmaking. We are pleased to welcome new Trustees Sage and Isaac, bringing our total next generation membership to 19. By 2020, we will number 35 Trustees.

This year we said goodbye to Tony Macklin, our Executive Director since January 2011. He left the Foundation to join his wife, Dr. Alexis Smith Macklin, who took a position as an Associate Dean and Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder. Tony was instrumental in helping the Foundation begin to plan for Trustee growth and future grantmaking strategies.

And we welcomed Jenny Kelly as our new Executive Director in February 2015. Jenny spent fourteen years as a program officer for the DSF Charitable Foundation and has been busy at work getting to know the Hunt family members and grantees. We are excited about the wealth of experience Jenny brings to the Foundation and her interest in family philanthropy.

Grants & Investments

The Foundation started off the new fiscal year with a semi-annual Trustee meeting in Denver, learning about how this growing city handles contemporary problems. Lt. Governor Joe Garcia, the Exec. Dir. of the Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the Exec. Dir. of Labor and Employment, and Director of Community Partnerships detailed Denver big picture challenges, best practices, and strategies for change. We met with Gary Community Investments and two of our grantees, Alliance for Sustainable Colorado and Young Americans Center for Financial Education, and learned first-hand the impact foundations and service providers are having in the Denver community.

We awarded a little more than $2.85 million in FY14/15. In addition to our Special Initiatives grants, the majority of our awards remain for general grants invited by the Trustees and/or of historical importance to the family. We are extremely proud of our grantees and the work they do. None of this would be possible without their dedication and drive.

After a grant assessment and review process, the Community Development Committee and Youth Violence Prevention Committee revised their guidelines for grants starting in 2015. The guidelines for all initiatives can be found on our website. The Obesity and Nutrition and International Development Learning Circles continue to research potential giving opportunities and are poised to consider grants in the near future.

The total assets of the Foundation reached approximately $80 million by fiscal year-end. The Investment Committee has spent the better part of a year researching impact investing, has allocated a portion of the endowment for alternative funding, and continues to investigate ways to prudently earn for our future.

I look forward to serving a second term as the Executive Committee Chair. In the upcoming year we will use our Trustee meetings to explore how we can work with grantees to make differences in the lives of individuals and our communities. It promises to be a time of growth and opportunity.

As always, feel free to contact our office at info@rahuntfdn.org or 412.281.8734 if you have questions.

 

Thank you,

John B. Hunt

FY15 Executive Committee Chair

June 24, 2016 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News

Boston, MA to Breckenridge, CO - Google Maps Summer has arrived, and not a moment too soon! And while many folks have the opportunity to relax during the summer, many of the Roy A. Hunt Foundation grantees are hard at work across the country making a difference in their communities.

We invite you to check out five organizations that receive program and general operating support from the Roy A. Hunt Foundation.

 

BOSTON: BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) facebook_over

BELL1BELL is a national nonprofit that is recognized as a leader in the field of expanded learning. Founded in 1992, BELL has helped at-risk students gain the academic skills they need to succeed in school and the self-efficacy they need to make healthy choices and set ambitious goals. BELL Summer and BELL After School serve children in grades K-8 who are performing below grade level and who attend high-poverty schools.

The Roy A. Hunt Foundation has supported BELL with $90,000 in grants since 2004.

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE: The Jaffrey-Rindge Rotary Charitable Fund

QUEST1In beautiful Rindge, NH, teams from the Jaffrey-Rindge Rotary, Franklin Pierce University, and the Jaffrey-Rindge School District have created a summer program for students, named QUEST (Quality Unlimited Educational Summer Training).

QUEST was developed in 2011 for local middle school students who might not otherwise have the opportunity to participate in a summer camp program. Franklin Pierce University provides the space, facilities, equipment, staff support and lunch for the camp.

The QUEST program served 75 sixth through eighth grade students from the Jaffrey-Rindge middle school last summer. Each year, the campers are pre- and post-tested on academic skills, and a majority of the students improved their scores and became better prepared for the new academic year. QUEST has been so successful that it is serving as a prototype which other New England Rotary Clubs are replicating within their own communities.

The QUEST summer program has received $25,000 in grants since 2012.

 

PITTSBURGH: Hill House Association facebook_over

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The construction of a safe and functional playground at the Hill House‘s Blakey Center has ensured that children in the Hill District area of Pittsburgh will have a safe place to spend many hours this summer.

Hill District families are more likely to earn income below the poverty line and rely on government assistance than families living in other areas of Pittsburgh. Additionally, children in the Hill District often lack access to safe play spaces, which are widely considered to be important for intellectual, social and emotional development.

A $50,000 grant from the Roy A. Hunt Foundation aided the Hill House Association to bring the Blakey Center playground up to code and make it available to neighborhood families.

 

CLEVELAND: Facing History and Ourselves facebook_over

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While their students are enjoying the sun and fun of summer, teachers in Cleveland are taking hard at work at Facing History and Ourselves’ Cleveland office, focusing on professional development in history and civic education. As of July 1, 2015, the number of Cleveland area teachers actively implementing Facing History in their classrooms is 1,363, an increase of 172 teachers since July 2014. These 1,363 teachers reach an estimated 136,300 students each year with Facing History’s unique content and methods, integrating themes of tolerance, social justice, and civic participation into rigorous academic content.

Facing History’s core services in Cleveland will include professional development seminars, workshops, in-service sessions, and individualized follow-up support for educators. Follow-up support includes individual teacher consultations and classroom visits for curriculum and lesson plan development; access to Facing History’s free lending library; and advice from staff about what books, websites, and films will best enrich their courses. Teachers can also invite witnesses to and survivors of history, to speak in their classrooms through our speakers’ bureau.

The Roy A. Hunt Foundation has provided more than $57,000 in grants to Facing History and Ourselves Cleveland since 2006.

 

DENVER: Young Americans Center for Financial Education facebook_over

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Many students in the Denver area are attending a different type of summer camp program at the Young Americans Center for Financial Education. Instead of swimming and hiking, these 8-13 year-olds are spending time learning the fundamentals of the U.S. economy.

Young Americans’ programs address financial literacy, free enterprise, global economics and entrepreneurship and serve more than 30,000 primarily Denver metro youth each year. They use experiential learning to help children and teens develop healthy financial habits for a self-sufficient life.

532735_10151031653836278_56457935_nThis summer, Young Americans is offering seven different types of weeklong summer camps to rising 3rd – 7th graders. The camps focus on government, banking, economics, supply and demand, advertising and more. The campers then put their knowledge to work by running a life-like town on the last day of camp!

Grants totaling more than $30,000 have been made to the Young Americans Center for Financial Education since 2012.

February 10, 2016 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News

We’ve finished awarding and paying grants for our current fiscal year, with $3,268,980 being delivered to nonprofits and schools across the country. You can download a new PDF of this year’s and last year’s grants. And, you can view and interactive map of our FY16 grants below. In the Map Options tab on the upper left, you can filter out different groups of grants and search based on proximity to an address.

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December 22, 2014 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News
Photo courtesy of Auberle

Photo courtesy of 2007 and 2011 YVP grantee Auberle

In December of 2014, the Foundation’s Community Development Committee and Youth Violence Prevention Committee updated their respective grantmaking guidelines. The new guidelines are in effect for inquiries, proposals, and grants starting in January of 2015. The changes reflect the Trustees’ evolving interests and thoughts about how this small family foundation can best make a difference with limited funds.

The Community Development Committee clarified its previous priorities and defined focus neighborhoods in Boston and Pittsburgh.

The Youth Violence Prevention Committee made larger changes to ensure its grantmaking aligns with recent research into effective practices. It also expanded to four from two priority geographies.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact the Foundation’s staff at 412.281.8734 or info@rahuntfdn.org.

April 16, 2014 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News

What connects the Hunt family to a country over 8,000 miles from the Foundation’s homebase in Pittsburgh, PA?Tanzania-map

A combination of personal volunteer experiences and work opportunities have tied several family members to the eastern African country of Tanzania over the years.

Currently, three dynamic organizations receive program and general operating support from the Roy A. Hunt Foundation.

2 Seeds Network   facebook_over

2seeds pic22Seeds is an umbrella organization that incubates small, efficient, and effective agricultural development projects in Africa. 2Seeds focuses on selecting, training, and mentoring bright and passionate graduates at the beginning of their careers to work with African partners. The teams address the issue of food and income security by training rural farmers in agricultural best practices. 2Seeds encourages its project leaders to embrace independent decision making, enforces financial accountability, and humbly seeks a deep and sincere partnership with the local African community.

The Roy A. Hunt Foundation’s Next Generation Fund made a $5,000 grant in 2013 that supported 2Seeds’ Masoko project. The collaboration is improving farmers’ access to and knowledge of markets, developing computer applications for data collection and use.

The Girls Foundation of Tanzania (TGFT)  facebook_over

gft1The focus of The Girls Foundation of Tanzania is simple: one girl at a time.

TGFT provides intellectual and financial support for educational opportunities to adolescent girls in Tanzania – a country where 95% of females do not finish high school. It prepares girls to take on their futures with confidence through development of their’ social, physical and emotional health and their academic success.

TGFT’s Girls Center was recently moved into a leased house on a 20-acre compound belonging to The Joshua Foundation, an established NGO in Arusha. The Girls Center is a secure learning environment where the girls live when school is not in session. Here, they can learn more about the world outside of their school life and the day-to-day realities of their villages.

TGFT currently sponsors 14 young woman as they strive to succeed in the secondary school. Since 2011, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation has provided $25,000 to The Girls Foundation of Tanzania for this program. Learn about these students via their bios.

Tanzanian Children’s Fund (TCF)  facebook_over

tcf2The Tanzanian Children’s Fund supports the Rift Valley Children’s Village, an orphanage in the Karatu region of Tanzania, and other related community-based programs that improve the lives of marginalized children.

148 Tanzanian-born employees, 6 expatriates, and 50 volunteers provide a loving home, family, and community for orphaned children. Around 88 children live full-time at the Children’s Village and 20 more live there during vacation from boarding school.

TCF provides leadership, teachers, and resources to 450 children from the surrounding communities attend Gyetighi Primary School. 100% of the Standard Seven class passed the national exam to qualify for secondary school in 2012, and 17 students at Gyetighi received scholarships to top tier secondary schools in 2011. Other highly valuable services include access to free high quality medical care and economic growth opportunities through a microfinance program.

Check out this video to TCF’s work in action! 

Since 2007, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation has made $60,000 in grants to the Tanzanian Children’s Fund. 

March 6, 2014 · by Foundation Staff · Grants News

If your 8th grader is at an underperforming school, how do you prepare her for success at a competitive, independent high school and later in college?

For 19 urban youth each year in the Boston area, one answer is Beacon Academy.

Learn more about Beacon Academy in this video.

The only independent school of its kind in the nation, Beacon Academy adds a transformational year between 8th and 9th grades to promising, hard-working students. Inspired by a challenging curriculum and stimulating co-curricular experiences, students learn vital academic skills and develop habits of mind that empower them to change the trajectory of their lives. Rigorous academics and empowering experiences enable Beacon Academy students to change the trajectory of their lives.

Beacon web 3

Photo courtesy of Beacon Academy

The Beacon Academy 14-month school year begins with five weeks of summer school made up of intense academic work, daily homework, exercise and field trips. In September, academic work focuses on honing writing skills, reading comprehension, and math. In most cases, students acquire the equivalent of more than two years of math and language skills. Throughout the year, numerous cultural opportunities for students help to enhance their social skills and bolster their confidence.

Beacon provides an Alumni Program that includes: 1) scheduled alumni events, 2) an emergency fund to assist with costs for items not covered by scholarship dollars, and 3) ongoing teacher contact.

In return, alumni give back to the Beacon community by returning to discuss, process, and share their independent school experiences with current students.

Alumni Snapshot

Beacon web 6

Photo courtesy of Beacon Academy

  • 147 graduates since the Academy’s founding in 2005
  • 99% have graduated from more than 60 high schools
  • 90% of high school graduates are enrolled at morethan 50 colleges, (others have enrolled in the armed forces)
  • Collectively, Beacon alumni have earned over $29 million in scholarship dollars

Since 2007, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation has provided $55,000 to Beacon Academy.

November 5, 2013 · by Foundation Staff · Uncategorized

We recently needed to create a brief timeline of the Foundation for a presentation. We thought you might find this window into our history informative.

RAHF Timeline Condensed

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